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20121101
20121130
STATION
FBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
and second coming of christ is imminent. amy kellogg what they share with the neolithic builders of stonehenge. but first, we travel to southern mexico and jewel of the mayan period. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> most of maya books, there were thousands of them that contacted were burned by spanish fires mostly because they were sacrilegious. there are four or five fragments that exist. they covered history and mathematics. >> for the last several decades, intense focus has been put on the mysterious mayan culture that flourished between the second through ninth century. some say they were prophets of doom. >> this was salvaged by accident almost.... >> archaeologist explains the importance of this broken tablet. >> this was salvaged? >> there was work by the mexican government by archaeologists. when they left some of the locals started digging around and found this monument. >> so from a small site? >> a small site that was mostly destroyed by a cement factory. almost all of the architecture has been ground up into gravel or cement. the main body of the textbook. >> it's only recently been ab
foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg is watching it play out from london. >> resistance to the budget cut in greece. the government voted in the wee hours of the morning to slash pension fan and cut salaries of french the police officers to judges. >> difficult vote. painful vote. we fully understand the situation of the people. >> the latest unemployment figures came out today. 25.4% overall. staggering 58% for the young. greece will go bankrupt if it doesn't get the next tranche of european bail-out money this month and it needed to make cuts to get cash. some experts say greece's problems alone don't have a direct impact on the united states economy. but the whole of the euro zone in crisis does. as america struggles to boost growth. >> there are issues with confidence. worsening of the euro zone would have global impact. that is something that the u.s. consumer cannot ignore. >> greece's prime minister tried to put a positive spin on the situation. >> after monday, my personal goal give greece people right for growth and bring back smiles. it cannot happen only with work and organ
other italian cities. eating is no longer allowed at historic sites. amy kellogg explains. >> reporter: police shoo a girl off the steps, she says it's not fair. critics call it the war on paninis and those behind the new ban on snacking around rome's historic monuments say the city has fallen to a level of unsustainable vulgarity with the consumption going on about town, an order established by the mayor of rome, bans eating food on the spanish steps at the found and other well-known tourist attractions, all punishable by a fine. an order which has taken many visitors by surprise. >> i think it is crazy. mad. why? i must pay 50 euros because i am eating my favorite ice cream near the fountain? >> reporter: fines can range from the equivalent of 35 to $650. all to keep the teenager city clean. >> i think i think it is right, this law, because, we can protect the monuments. >> reporter: so far, the bark is worse than e the bite. police prefer to warn people to take their gelato elsewhere than to find when rome needs tourism in the town, too. la dolce vita experience involves food, but a
and evil and the belief that the second coming of christ is eminent. amy kellogg discovers what the maya share with the village of stonehedge. first the mysterious maya. we travel to the rain forest of southern mexico and the jewel of the maya classic period. >> most of the myians there were thousands of them as they contact between the spanish and the myian were burned by spanish fires mostly because they are sack religious. >> there are four really five that i know of that exist still to this day. they cover subjects like medicine, history, genealogy, astronomy, mathematics. >> for the last several decades the focus has been put on the mysterious myian culture that flourished between the second through ninth century. some say they were actually prophets of doom. >> archaeologist christopher powell explains the importance of this broken tablet strictly known as monument 6. >> this is one of the few things that were salvaged. >> there was some work by the mexican government done there by archeologists and when they left some of the local started digging around as well and found this monu
of the bail-out money. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg has the story from london. >> they were peaceful but this was a protest. these greeks weary of seeing tensions shrink -- pensions shrink and jobs grow were not happy about the decision to grant them more in bail-out money. they know the feet will be held ever closer to the austerity fire. >> the long installment is not for the workers or the people. but the banks. for those drinking our blood. nothing can change. >> greece's new prime minister welcomed the deal to keep greece afloat, the feisty opposition leader decried it as hollow fix. >> it does not include greece or a plan for greece. >> in a marathon session in brussels, they nibbled around the essentials of the massive debt problem. making adjustments sort of forgiving greece's debt. that might have been political poison for the european officials planning to stand for re-election. but moves such as deferring debt repayment, lowering the interest rate and buying back debt crafted to a package some call the greek fudge that may just be delaying more bitte
is viewed with considerable interest around the world. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg shows us from london. >> mr. speaker, the house will join me in congratulating president obama on the election victory. >> europeans overwhelmingly wanted to see president obama return to the white house. the special edition of the front page screamed one word. "yes!" however, you will find some who have been underwhelmed by the past four years. >> the point about obama is that he is sort of impressive man without being impressive president. i think that there was a feeling for example, certainly that he was apologetic about america. >> some con seventives question obama's moves toward a greater social welfare state in america. as europeans come to understand that their entitlement culture is unsustainable. further east in russia, dmitry medvedev expressed relief that man who called russia the top geopolitical foe mitt romney did not win the vote. vladimir putin graduated obama it's hard to guess how he really feels. >> kremlin and putin, the presence of russia is not about showing it
hands on vital bailout money, money that it needs. amy kellogg live in london this. amy? >> reporter: bill, as you can see the situation is bad. that is violence that flared in the midst of a two-day general strike called in greece. the government keeps making these cuts it needs to make in order to gets financial house somewhat in order. this is against the backdrop of staggering unemployment. new figures out today, show augt unemployment in greece is 25.4%. youth unemployment at a staggering 58%. unemployment in greece is actually twice the eurozone average. a record 1.27 million greeks were out of work in august. that is up 38% from last year. i know i have just thrown a lot of figures at you, bill. but i think it does paint a very accurate picture of the pain and the desperation right now. greece entering its sixth straight year, bill of recession. bill: that is remarkable. thank you, amy kellogg there. unemployment among young people in greece, 50% plus. staggering. amy kellogg in london. martha: senate majority leader harry reid says that senate democrats are looking forward to
market. chris? >> chris: amy kellogg from london. thank you for that. still ahead israel takes out with of the top targets. but first, the man many blame for deadly meningitis outbreak takes the fifth. lists all done. raise the roof! no one says th anymore, mom. [ woman ] raise the roof! ah? raise the roof! [ male announcer ] it's our biggest toy rollback of the year. find hundreds of rollbacks on the season's hottest toys in stores now, from america's gift headquarters, walmart. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. >> chris: lawmakers did not get much information from the man who runs the company tied to the meningitis outbreak that killed 32 people. correspondent jonathan serrie tells us he was asked a number of key questions but he wouldn't answer. >> i decline to answer. >> on advice of counsel i decline to answer. >> barry, the coowner of the massachusetts pharmacy implicated in the deadly meningitis outbreak refused to testify despite repeated questions from a congressional panel. >> what do you say to all of these patients and al
in the english countryside, solstice celebration at stonehenge was perhaps the most revealing. amy kellogg uncovers that mystery. >> the times change, but the sky remains the same. the last of the stone age era lived on earth approximately thousands of years before the maya even came on the scene. both the maya and these early farmers held sacred rituals to honor the sun on the same day, the summer solstice, longest day of the year. fast forward a few thousand years to present day stonehenge in england, summer solstice, 2012. >> to thetrr longest day we will play. ♪ ♪ >> do these modern day druids, pagans and all around revelers look like they are preparing for the end of the world? >> we believe the mayans ought to start a new calendar we don't believe it is the end of the world as far as we are concerned. >> no doomsday love. >> stone hedge seems to be a ceremonial spot, because of the mystery surrounding its its alignment with the sun on the days of the summer and winter solstice it is an enduring gathering point. >> stonehenge is many things to many people. >> peter a car son expla
to these countries now that demand is falling as people are simply not spending. cheryl. cheryl: amy kellogg live for us out of london. thank you very much. dennis: here is an economic lesson defying the laws of supply and demand. facebook shares top 10% this morning, now up 9% despite the market being flooded with more than 800 new insider shares. usually huge supply will lead to a drop in price. as we send this chart, all facebook did solvent, turns out to look at this chart, the price has fallen the last 12 rading days. it is baked in, baby. and as we do every 15 minutes, stocks now. cheryl: the dow down 82 points right now? dennis: it gives me pain, cannot believe it. cheryl: i think nicole will help you feel a bit better. nicole: listen, there is the good news and bad news. we're still going, still up here to date, we have down arrows for the major averages, the dow and s&p down nearly 3% each and tech heavy nasdaq composite down 3% this month. take a look at advanced micro. went to the post, looking at advanced micro devices. exploring options. could it mean the whole sale of the company,
to preserve its most historic sites by banning eating. amy kellogg is live in london. nice to see you, happy thanksgiving. i know italy is known for its food and sites, and people trying to combine both, so what's the point of this? >> reporter: yeah. the point, rick, really is to keep the eternal city eternally lovely. and i have to say it's not just the tourists, rick, or those who go to rome to eat, pray, love who are complaining. there was sort of a flash mob last month of italians who were wielding panini -- italian sandwiches -- and they rushed the steps of the city hall. of course, rome doesn't frown upon food, it's just now frowning upon the consumption of food on or around important monuments. and that's sort of a difficult thing to enforce in a city that's brimming with food shops. but it's serious business. the fine for, um, sort of having your lunch right around one of the important mown units like the trevi fountain can range the equivalent of $35-$650. it's interesting, other italian cities have similar regulations, we just don't hear about them anymore, and the country is full
sound familiar to you. amy kellogg is watching this from the london bureau with more. amy? >> reporter: jenna, this is kind of a vicious cycle. these strikers are saying enough is enough. they feel all the austerity cuts are actually stymieing growth in the eurozone. one protester today said we need to leave something behind for our children but obviously at this point anyway, there is nothing. now in spain despite the cuts the economy will shrink 1.5% this year. iberia, the airline, just cut 4500 jobs. one of the major papers is laying off a quarter of its staff. the government stepped in to stop evictions of people who can't pay their mortgages after two people killed themselves when they learned that they would be forced out of their homes. now in italy, there were demonstrations up and undo the country. some of them also got quite violent. students were protesting, specifically cuts to education. strikers would like austerity measures eased all around, especially as there is some evidence so far that these cuts have not done much to pay down debt. growth is still low if it exists a
in the book of revelations. amy kellogg went to stonehenge west of london. there are doomsday scenarios that have been set up and talked about among various civilizations since the beginning of time. up until the end of time. so we explored at least three of the more significant ones. >> steve: and the mayan people, how did they come up with that number? was it just the fact that it's 12-21-2012? >> what they worked on was the movement of the sun and how it aligns itself every 365 days on the winter solstice. that's what they based everything on. it's a fascinating theory. the question is, what happens to your plans on december 22? >> alisyn: i don't know. what does? >> you got all the presents under the christmas tree? is it even significant? we look at all that and the doomsday scenario. >> steve: very nice. stay right here for just a moment. because we want to know what's on your program coming up in 14 minutes. >> brian: america's news room. >> i've got my partner, her name is martha mccallum. >> brian: where is she? >> this is usually the part of the day where either she or i would
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)